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Serving Scarborough Bluffs Communities since 1983  Issued first
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ADVERTISING   416-691-4085

Happy Valentines’
and A Safe
Family Day Weekend
Feb. 14-16th
- from
Bluffs Monitor
Craiglee Art Gallery Sale
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Pick Up a Copy!
at most stores, banks, libraries or community centres in the
Scarborough Bluffs
Communities along the lake between
Victoria Park and Port Union
villages.
Northern boundaries are
Eglinton on the west and 401 / Island Rd. on the east.
Bluffs Monitor can also be found in stores along Kingston Road west of Victoria Park Ave., to Main St., also in the Main Street Library and in Loblaws on Victoria Park Ave.

House to House delivery
by our  Volunteers
on select streets
throughout the Bluffs area.
Birch Cliff
Oak Ridge
Clairlea
Cliffside
Cliffcrest
Scarborough Village
Guildwood
Highland Creek
West Hill
 On November 28th, Craiglee Nursing Home had once again showcased its residents’ beautiful art works through their 2nd annual Art Gallery Sale with over 80 paintings on display. The Craiglee artists together with Viviana Szabo, the lead facilitator of the art program, were recognized in the opening ceremony held in the morning.
 In the afternoon, the program continued with an entertainer and viewing of the art work.
 This year’s art works were special as they were produced in collaboration with Allan and Modesto, both volunteers at
Craiglee. Their assistance in the art program had contributed to the success of the event.
 The Art Gallery Sale was a huge success, with over $700 in revenue towards the Residents’ Council fund.
 The art program continues to provide a therapeutic means for our residents to express themselves and bring out the best from each person. We thank all families, residents, staff and guests who have encouraged, appreciated, and supported our residents’ art work.
City Will Take
OMB Power
Gridlock at Council and on the Street
by Larry Johnston
 The City of Toronto intends to take over the power to hear planning appeals from the Ontario Municipal Board, and do it by September 1.
 The Liberal government gave the municipalities the legal right to ask for this power several years ago, but Toronto is the first one to take up the challenge. City taxpayers will be paying a few million dollars for the privilege, as disclosed at meetings across the city last year. The fee to launch an appeal will likely be close to what it is now, but additional charges could be less.
 The liveliest meeting about the Local Appeal body (LAB) was in Scarborough in late spring, and it may have tipped the scale in favour of the project among city staff present at the time.
However, provincial procedures will have to be followed so the hearings may well resemble the present OMB hearings with most of the same lawyers, and the evidence of qualified planners and engineers taking pre-cedence over what neighbourhood citizens see on the ground.
 But councillors hope a big change will come with their appointment of hearing officers, who are currently appointed by the provincial government. They used to have nearly a lifetime job like a judge, but since the Harris years, they can be out after three years. They are loath not to support provincial policy on intensifying land use.
 The council has set out principles for the qualifi-cations and character of the future Toronto hearing officers including the sense of fairness.
 The plan to replace the Ontario Municipal Board with a local appeal body LAB did not pass by an overwhelming margin. Scarborough councillors Michael Thompson and deputy mayor Norm Kelly voted against it as well as the Ford brothers and Gloria Lucy Luby, Peter Leon and Michael Grimes from Etobicoke and Cesar Palacio and John Parker. Rob Ford has opposed council sending city solicitors or hiring outside planners to support ratepayers who are opposing variances that the city staff supports, as a waste of money. Council voted to find out how much it would cost the City to have planning staff report on every application for a severance or minor variance.
• Next Issue
Delivery
is Feb. 4th’15
Please have all ads/articles/payments

in for
Wed.,
Jan. 21st, 2015.


416-691-4085
 

Pick Up a Copy!
at most stores, banks, libraries or community centres in the
Scarborough Bluffs
Communities along the lake between
Victoria Park and Port Union
villages.
Northern boundaries are
Eglinton on the west and 401 / Island Rd. on the east.
Bluffs Monitor can also be found in stores along Kingston Road west of Victoria Park Ave., to Main St., also in the Main Street Library and in Loblaws on Victoria Park Ave.

House to House delivery
by our  Volunteers
on select streets
throughout the Bluffs area.
Birch Cliff
Oak Ridge
Clairlea
Cliffside
Cliffcrest
Scarborough Village
Guildwood
Highland Creek
West Hill

Scarborough Bluffs Communities are Unique
The photo at the top of this page is of the Bluffs today, seen from the bottom of Brimley in what is known as Bluffers Park
They have a history of European occupation going back to the seventeen hundreds. Lowland Scots emigrated to this area after being pushed out of their farms in Scotland by the titled gentry. Some of their descendents still live here today.
The name “Scarborough Bluffs” was given to it by Elizabeth Graves Simcoe, wife of the first Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada,
John Graves Simcoe because it reminded her of Scarborough Bluffs in England.
The Bluffs are the only geologically scenic area in the greater Toronto area but are also a geologic wonder, visited by scientists from all over the world to study its exposed history of the planet.  
Craiglee Nursing Home residents show off their art !
by Larry Johnston
 The gridlock that nearly froze the last council seems to have dissipated, perhaps forever, through the skilful management of Mayor John Tory and his transition team. The gridlock on the streets may be a much tougher matter.
 Tory is conciliatory with council. He is anything but with people who block the road with cars and trucks or construction zones. After a 30-day warning period, trucks that block traffic lanes in rush hour will be towed away. If there is a shortage of tow truck drivers, Tory said he might drive one himself on a crucial tow.
 There must be realistic fees for the fees for builders who take out traffic lanes to put up new buildings. That should discourage the practice, or bring the barricades down sooner if there are necessary lane closures at all.
 He also said the City would add 40 traffic cameras this year and 80 more in 2016. 450 more traffic signals will be retimed by the end of 2015 than previously planned. Road construction will start at 6 am and last until 11 pm where possible.
 The gridlock on council was easier to deal with. For one thing, as former deputy mayor Norm Kelly observed, confrontation really ended when he took over day-to-day leadership as council ordered for the last part of Mayor Ford”s term. However, there was a brief flurry of inner city vs suburbs criticism as downtown councillors were left off the new
executive committee. It all fizzled out after Kristyn Won-Tam was named by amendment to two positions. Two members were added to the committee of adjustment, so Councillor John Filion withdrew his objection because of two legal issues to Councillor Georgio Marmolitti being a member. That left Councillor Gordon Perks as the lone dissenter.
 Perks' Parkdale may have the loneliest voice on council this term rather than Etobicoke north. That is quite a shift.
 As its first business item, the committee approved Gary Crawford as the budget chief as the Scarborough Southwest councillor was the only nominee for the position. Mayor Tory asked him if he wanted to reconsider. Council has yet to grasp the mayor's sense of humour as the question did not even result in a giggle.
Other business included reports on how well the City did in relation to its forecasts last year. The committee was concerned that a 45 per cent drop in traffic ticket revenue over the last two years could mean a one per cent tax increase, all items being equal.
 However, all items were not equal and there was a $450 million surplus, mostly because of the building boom. Part of that was real estate tax revenue.
 The staff said they were trying to forecast much closer to the final number in the coming budget.