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Serving Scarborough Bluffs Communities since 1983  Issued first
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ADVERTISING   416-691-4085
You Are Invited!  
Susan Dimitrakopoulos (“SpudSnaps”) Exhibit, Sept. 16 - 27th at Framing Dames, 362 Old Kingston Rd. 416-287-2025  Reception Friday, Sept 19th from 6pm to 8:30pm
Curves Open House - Sept 15 to Sept 21  3785 Kingston Road, 416-269-2642 - Free Info Tour - Ladies only
Art in The Beach  Sat & Sun. Sept. 20th & 21st 10am - 5pm The Beach Guild of Fine Art’s 20th Annual Fall Art Show & Sale - Paintings fron over 40 of the Guild Artisits. FREE admission, lucky draw & gift boutique.  For more information:  www.BeachGuildoffineArt.com at Beaches United Church, 140 Wineva Ave (at Queen St)

Pick Up a Copy!
at most stores, banks, libraries or community centres in the
Scarborough Bluffs
Communities along the lake between
Victoria Park and Port Union
villages.
Northern boundaries are
Eglinton on the west and 401 / Island Rd. on the east.
Bluffs Monitor can also be found in stores along Kingston Road west of Victoria Park Ave., to Main St., also in the Main Street Library and in Loblaws on Victoria Park Ave.

House to House delivery
by our  Volunteers
on select streets
throughout the Bluffs area.
Birch Cliff
Oak Ridge
Clairlea
Cliffside
Cliffcrest
Scarborough Village
Guildwood
Highland Creek
West Hill
Celebration at Scarborough Museum
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by Tristan Simpson
 Hundreds of visitors celebrated Canada Day at the Scarborough Museum with karaoke and a slice of cake.
 The Scarborough Museum had its annual Canadian, eh! celebration. The event was supported through a grant from the Canadian heritage department’s Celebrate Canada program. The affair rejoiced Canada’s 147th with birthday cake.
 If guests weren’t eating cake, then they were snacking on historical treats or competing in the annual pie-eating contest.
 Entertainment included croquet, karaoke and Scarborough Fever (a silent play created by the museum’s youth volunteers).
 The museum had many interactive exhibits. Discover Scarborough, an
exhibit developed by the volunteers, traces Scarborough’s history from its rural beginnings to its multicultural landscape.
 While the museum emphasized Scarborough’s roots it also provided the opportunity for visitors to express themselves.
 The museum’s volunteers conducted their Community Memories Kiosk, an oral history exhibit that had visitors describe Canada in one word. There was also a life-size world map on display for New Canadians to show what countries they emigrated from.
 All of the museum’s buildings were open for visitors to discover what life in Scarborough was like 100 years ago.
 The museum is comprised of four historical buildings. The first building is the Cornell house. The house, which
was built in 1858, was moved to Thomson Memorial Park from Markham Road in 1962.
 Museum staff made lemon cream candies inside the Cornell kitchen.
 They also baked scones inside the McCowan log cabin using an open hearth.
 The last two historical buildings, Hough Carriage Workshop and the Kennedy Discovery Gallery (KDG), were open for visitors to see. The workshop housed tools used for building carriages.
 The KDG is frequently used as a gallery for exhibits, but on Canada Day it was a place for visitors to play board games like chess, Chinese checkers and snakes and ladders.
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 in for
Wed.,
Sept. 17th, 2014.
The Guild Inn
Dogs
Off
Leash
Educate and Enforce
 GROUPS & Municipal CANDIDATES: Please advise Bluffs Monitor of
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 The City of Toronto and Toronto Police Services are kicking off a public education campaign and bylaw blitz encouraging residents to keep their dogs on a leash except when in the City's 57 leash-free parks.
 Enforcement officers will work their way through Toronto's parks, including, for example, Trinity Bellwoods Park, Birkdale Ravine, Thompson Park, Wexford Park and Hunter's Glen Park.
 In Toronto, all dogs must be kept on a leash whenever they are on any property other than their owner's – unless they are in designated "leash-free" areas. Owners are responsible for ensuring that their dogs do not run at large. The expression "running at large" means the dog is unleashed.
 In 2013, there were a total of 130 complaints regarding dogs running off-leash. To date in 2014, there have been 440 complaints and 66 charges. A fine of $360 can be issued for allowing a dog to run at large except in a posted designated leash-free area.
 Owners are responsible for their dog and any injuries or damage caused by any dog in their care.
 In order to use the leash-free zones, dog owners must have vaccinated and licensed their dogs. Dogs that are aggressive to humans, dogs with a history of biting, and other types of animals are not permitted in the leash-free zones.
 In addition to being leashed, all dogs in Toronto must be licensed. Licences cost $25 a year and are available online at www.toronto.ca/animalservices.
by Larry Johnston
 A hefty pile of papers were pushed through the last meeting of community council last month intending to start the city efforts to restore the currently boarded-up derelict, Guild Inn, on the long road to recovery.
 The City has reached an agreement with virtually the only private restaurant and entertainment business still interested, in bringing back the Inn on part of the famous cliff side park as a banquet hall and high end dining establishment. The motor hotel concept that gave the Inn an international reputation for many years will be gone – like the Inn on the Park, but at least it won't be a car dealership.
 The private company Dynamic Hospitality and Entertainment has created a number of banquet halls and entertainment centres in the shells of former private clubs, movie theatres and the like across Toronto. This would appear to be its most dynamic project. A restaurant and banquet hall of about 25,000 sq. ft. will be built on the site of the old Guild Inn.
 More of the original building will be saved than in previous concepts including the dormer on the south side, The original Bickford mansion at the centre of the Inn will be retained while additions made by
the second owners, Rosa and Spencer Clarke, will go the way of the hotel tower that was demolished a few years ago. The Studio Building torn down after it was gutted by fire at Christmas 2008 has also been lost.
 The staff report concedes that over the years since its closure, the whole of the Guild Inn has suffered from considerable vandalism and neglect. So bad is it that Heritage Canada the National Trust added the property to its list of ten heritage sites in Canada most at risk for “demolition by neglect.”
 However, distinguished heritage architect Philip Goldsmith has developed 12 guiding principles to be used in restoring the site in the proper historic context to enhance its designation under the heritage act. Goldsmith was involved in previous proposals as well, so he knows the site.
 Council adopted the City's heritage staff report that would see the Bickford House restored to its former glory as the country estate that the Clarkes bought in 1932. The wings and dormers that they added as it gradually evolved as the Guild Inn will be removed.
 Two new wings will be added for Dynamic's banquet and entertainment operations that will require the removal of the garage and tennis courts.  /cont’d....
 

Pick Up a Copy!
at most stores, banks, libraries or community centres in the
Scarborough Bluffs
Communities along the lake between
Victoria Park and Port Union
villages.
Northern boundaries are
Eglinton on the west and 401 / Island Rd. on the east.
Bluffs Monitor can also be found in stores along Kingston Road west of Victoria Park Ave., to Main St., also in the Main Street Library and in Loblaws on Victoria Park Ave.

House to House delivery
by our  Volunteers
on select streets
throughout the Bluffs area.
Birch Cliff
Oak Ridge
Clairlea
Cliffside
Cliffcrest
Scarborough Village
Guildwood
Highland Creek
West Hill
The photo at the top of this page is of the Bluffs today, seen from the bottom of Brimley in what is known as Bluffers Park
They have a history of European occupation going back to the seventeen hundreds. Lowland Scots emigrated to this area after being pushed out of their farms in Scotland by the titled gentry. Some of their descendents still live here today.
The name “Scarborough Bluffs” was given to it by Elizabeth Graves Simcoe, wife of the first Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada,
John Graves Simcoe because it reminded her of Scarborough Bluffs in England.
The Bluffs are the only geologically scenic area in the greater Toronto area but are also a geologic wonder, visited by scientists from all over the world to study its exposed history of the planet.  
Scarborough Bluffs Communities are Unique
courtesy Scarborough Historical Society