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re: May’15 Bluffs Monitor:  Cliffside Village Books  2404 Kingston Rd 647-827-9199  Please note that the Writer’s Group on Wednesdays is no longer meeting.  However - drop in anytime or check them out at:  wwwfacebook.com/CliffsideVillage Books
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BOOK NOW for
Bluffs Monitor’s
June 3rd  issue.

Father’s Day is
June 21st

Pick Up a Copy!
at most stores, banks, libraries or community centres in the
Scarborough Bluffs
Communities along the lake between
Victoria Park and Port Union
villages.
Northern boundaries are
Eglinton on the west and 401 / Island Rd. on the east.
Bluffs Monitor can also be found in stores along Kingston Road west of Victoria Park Ave., to Main St., also in the Main Street Library and in Loblaws on Victoria Park Ave.

House to House delivery
by our  Volunteers
on select streets
throughout the Bluffs area.
Birch Cliff
Oak Ridge
Clairlea
Cliffside
Cliffcrest
Scarborough Village
Guildwood
Highland Creek
West Hill
“The choir in rehearsal”
Barbershoppers Perform Locally
THE QUARRY
Quarry Area Facing Stacked Development
CCQLD Annual Meeting
by Larry Johnston
 Sometimes no news is good news, and little news is not bad.
 Members of the Concerned Citizens for Quarry Land Development at their annual meeting last month learned that the city had heard nothing from the major developer in the quarry lands, an entity of the Conservatory Group, since their last annual meeting in January last year.
 The news has not changed since the winter of 2013-14 when discussions with the city seemed to freeze like the weather. The major owner and potential developer declined the proposal of Councillor Gary Crawford that it swap its quarry lands to about the same amount in the middle of Scarborough.
 The City put a one-foot reserve on any land that would give the developer access to a present or future Toronto Lands property or a public street.
 The City would have to agree to sell this reserve to the adjoining owner before anything could take place with Toronto Lands. Their staff pointed out two dead-ends that are part in this situation on the east side of the publicly owned parcel.
 Toronto Lands has made some modifications to its plans, placing its north-south road as close as possible to the property line. Because of concerns of residents to the south, the plan no longer calls for a direct connection across Gerrard Street with Blantyre Avenue, but rather meets Gerrard farther east. The new street will cross or turn into an east-west street that will run from the traffic light on Victoria Park.
 The former driving range site east of Victoria Park will be taken up by a 110,000 sq. ft. box store, whose identity is still unknown.
 The Build Toronto staff said that there were environmental problems that had to be cleaned up near or under the old driving range that could not be ignored. They also have to find a way for the whole development to make money. The commercial property will offset the low density housing promised to the neighbourhood.
 The park will take up much of the centre of the 16-acre Toronto Lands site.
 Indeed, the whole of the quarry lands is a labyrinth of pipes and soil surprises. For example there is a structure that was built for releasing methane gas if necessary in the centre of the property that costarts under the next commercial property northeast of Victoria Park and Gerrard.
 The CCQLD soldiers on with members needed to join the executive.  Tim Weber has now been elected president for a second year. He thanked past president Mark Brender, who is now leaving the organization after years of work “for teaching us everything we know.”
 There was a lot of concern about traffic at the meeting. Councillor Crawford sees the redesign of the Clonmore-Gerrard intersection as the only solution with a traffic light, but that is years away.
 The owner of the Treehouse, which is a potential heritage building on Gerrard just west of Clonmore, has presented a concept to the City for multiple units. Scarborough planners think the owner's proposed density is too high, Crawford told the group.
 Weber said CCQLD would concentrate on the quarry lands proper. It could advise ratepayer groups on how to deal with proposals for other lands in the area.
• Next Issue
Delivery
is June 3rd’15
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IN for
Wed.,
May 20th, 2015.

416-691-4085
by Larry Johnston
 Nearly 140 stacked town-houses have been proposed for one hectare of property between Clonmore Drive and the main CN tracks.
Scarborough planners have to prepare for the first public meeting on the project although they have many concerns about it and will be seeking “significant modifi-cation.” The location is just east of the quarry lands where high-rises have been proposed, with a single private entrance for the whole townhouse community.
 The development requires the removal of a woodlot covering two of the present lots as well as seven houses to the east. The applicants are planning nine blocks of townhouses with only two having frontage on Clonmore Drive. The single private driveway to serve the property would split these two front blocks near Queensbury Ave. Two other blocks would have no public or private roadway frontage.
 Three townhouse blocks would be less than 30 metres from the railway corridor to the north. In the report on trees, 141 are identified immediately adjacent to the property and 67 of these have diameters greater than 30 cm. (about 10 inches measures four feet above grade.)
 The proponents are applying for a change from neighbourhood to apartment neighbourhood zoning.
 The local councillor, Gary Crawford, asked that when the public meeting is organized that all property owners down to Kingston Road be notified.
 

Pick Up a Copy!
at most stores, banks, libraries or community centres in the
Scarborough Bluffs
Communities along the lake between
Victoria Park and Port Union
villages.
Northern boundaries are
Eglinton on the west and 401 / Island Rd. on the east.
Bluffs Monitor can also be found in stores along Kingston Road west of Victoria Park Ave., to Main St., also in the Main Street Library and in Loblaws on Victoria Park Ave.

House to House delivery
by our  Volunteers
on select streets
throughout the Bluffs area.
Birch Cliff
Oak Ridge
Clairlea
Cliffside
Cliffcrest
Scarborough Village
Guildwood
Highland Creek
West Hill
The photo at the top of this page is of the Bluffs today, seen from the bottom of Brimley in what is known as Bluffers Park
They have a history of European occupation going back to the seventeen hundreds. Lowland Scots emigrated to this area after being pushed out of their farms in Scotland by the titled gentry. Some of their descendents still live here today.
The name “Scarborough Bluffs” was given to it by Elizabeth Graves Simcoe, wife of the first Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada,
John Graves Simcoe because it reminded her of Scarborough Bluffs in England.
The Bluffs are the only geologically scenic area in the greater Toronto area but are also a geologic wonder, visited by scientists from all over the world to study its exposed history of the planet.  

Scarborough Communities are Unique!
photo by Derek Pinder
by Derek Pinder
 The East York Barbershoppers are a tour de force in Toronto’s musical scene. Their home is on the doorstep of the Bluffs community and yet they are not as well known as they should be. So Bluffs Monitor dropped in to one of their Tuesday evening rehearsals at Harmony Hall on Gower Street to find out what’s going on. We received a warm welcome from Jerry Beckerle and George Shields, both of whom are Past Presidents. George is actually a founding member of the EYB; he remembers digging the foundations of Harmony Hall back in the 1960s and is still singing today. Jerry and George took great pride in showing us around the premises which is a treasure trove of barbershop history dating back to the
formation of the EYB in 1950.
 Our peregrinations were interrupted by the insistent sound of a hand bell summoning the singers to the start of rehearsals. Some 45 men were present and although most members live nearby, Steve Fast drives in from Hamilton every week and others travel from Lindsay and Pickering. After some warm-up exercises, rehearsals for the upcoming 65th anniversary show commenced under the energetic leadership of Chorus Director Pat Hannon. It was quite an eye-opener to see how much work goes into achieving the harmony and vitality that define a good barbershop choir. The dedication and enthusiasm of every singer was palpable, an air of camaraderie enveloped both choir and Director, and the beauty of the singing
was often overwhelming. Frankly, we’ve never seen a bunch of guys having more fun.
 If you would like to hear the EYB you’ll find a list of events on their website at www.eybs.ca but, as Director Greg Shields told us, what they would really like is for you to come along and sing. This is, of course, a male chorus but there are no other entry qualifications. Greg pointed out that the oldest active member is 89 and the youngest 22. Members come from all walks of life (although curiously they have never had a barber) and very few of them can read music. Just turn up at Harmony Hall at 7:30pm on any Tuesday evening. Not only will you be a welcome guest but you will discover the true joy of singing.